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Auditory Processing Skills

In conjunction with our movement-based program, the brain is now adequately prepped and ready for the next step of the learning process.

Have you ever experienced sitting in a classroom or have had a conversation with a friend where you cannot remember relevant details or what was discussed after it was over? While most of us have experienced this at one time or another, there are those that experience it on a regular basis whether at home, in the classroom, or in social situations. This is what we call auditory processing.

Auditory processing is how we make sense of information through our ears. This is different from experiencing deafness or being hard of hearing. Difficulties with auditory processing do not affect what is heard by the ear, but how the information is interpreted and processed.

In today’s world, the speed at which we process information is critical to how we perform in school, build relationships, and develop in our careers. Because auditory processing affects our ability to analyze or make sense of information, it can directly affect speech, language, and all areas of learning, especially reading and spelling.

Auditory Processing Challenges

If you have a child that struggles with auditory processing, you may have noticed some of the following behaviors:

  • Has difficulty grasping stories, conversations, or lectures.
  • Doesn’t like social situations because of the difficulty to sustain attention, misses the point, or experiences unsuccessful interactions.
  • Sometimes asks and re-asks the same question and may be labeled as a poor listener or inattentive.
  • Needs constant repetition and clarification.
  • Experiences trouble recalling information from a story read aloud.
  • Misunderstands spoken information, directions, or questions.
  • Is easily distracted by background noise.
  • Finds some sound uncomfortable or painful.
  • Experiences weakness in verbal expression.
  • Has poor voice quality.

Auditory Processing Solutions

At Integrated Learning Strategies, we combine our movement-based program with auditory listening (music) that enables our students to regulate their emotions, improve coordination, process information, and enhance self-expression and self-confidence.

Our auditory listening program includes classical music that is acoustically modified to stimulate or “exercise” auditory processing that cultivates learning and enhanced brain activity. The music is loaded on an iPod and paired with special headphones used by each of our students during their scheduled session for approximately 45 minutes.

Each student is evaluated to determine an appropriate, individual listening plan. This plan can be adjusted based on individual needs. Whatever the listening schedule, consistency on the part of the listener is critical.

Many parents and teachers who interact with our students on a regular basis see results of listening almost immediately during and after they complete the program. A majority of our students who combine movement with our listening program experienced greater awareness of surroundings, improvement in speech and language, better attentiveness, and can process and store valuable information in addition to other important benefits.

Our Services

Auditory Processing Skills

In conjunction with our movement-based program, the brain is now adequately prepped and ready for the next step of the learning process.

Have you ever experienced sitting in a classroom or have had a conversation with a friend where you cannot remember relevant details or what was discussed after it was over? While most of us have experienced this at one time or another, there are those that experience it on a regular basis whether at home, in the classroom, or in social situations. This is what we call auditory processing.

Auditory processing is how we make sense of information through our ears. This is different from experiencing deafness or being hard of hearing. Difficulties with auditory processing do not affect what is heard by the ear, but how the information is interpreted and processed.

In today’s world, the speed at which we process information is critical to how we perform in school, build relationships, and develop in our careers. Because auditory processing affects our ability to analyze or make sense of information, it can directly affect speech, language, and all areas of learning, especially reading and spelling.

Auditory Processing Challenges

If you have a child that struggles with auditory processing, you may have noticed some of the following behaviors:

  • Has difficulty grasping stories, conversations, or lectures.
  • Doesn’t like social situations because of the difficulty to sustain attention, misses the point, or experiences unsuccessful interactions.
  • Sometimes asks and re-asks the same question and may be labeled as a poor listener or inattentive.
  • Needs constant repetition and clarification.
  • Experiences trouble recalling information from a story read aloud.
  • Misunderstands spoken information, directions, or questions.
  • Is easily distracted by background noise.
  • Finds some sound uncomfortable or painful.
  • Experiences weakness in verbal expression.
  • Has poor voice quality.

Auditory Processing Solutions

At Integrated Learning Strategies, we combine our movement-based program with auditory listening (music) that enables our students to regulate their emotions, improve coordination, process information, and enhance self-expression and self-confidence.

Our auditory listening program includes classical music that is acoustically modified to stimulate or “exercise” auditory processing that cultivates learning and enhanced brain activity. The music is loaded on an iPod and paired with special headphones used by each of our students during their scheduled session for approximately 45 minutes.

Each student is evaluated to determine an appropriate, individual listening plan. This plan can be adjusted based on individual needs. Whatever the listening schedule, consistency on the part of the listener is critical.

Many parents and teachers who interact with our students on a regular basis see results of listening almost immediately during and after they complete the program. A majority of our students who combine movement with our listening program experienced greater awareness of surroundings, improvement in speech and language, better attentiveness, and can process and store valuable information in addition to other important benefits.

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