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Reading and Spelling

Reading is the foundational element that shapes a child’s future. It impacts their level of education, societal placement, associations with others, financial stability, and ultimately their career growth and development. The future success of all students hinges on their ability to become proficient readers. Surprisingly enough, scientists believe 95% of all children can learn to read, yet about 20% of elementary students nationwide have trouble reading.

The progress of reading development has also changed within the last 20 years. When kids began Kindergarten 20 years ago, educators focused more on creativity and sensory integration as essential building blocks for reading. However, in today’s society, parents and educators now feel the pressures to have children reading before they enter kindergarten.

Some students who experience challenges with reading may be misdiagnosed as “dyslexic” or are perceived as less intelligent. These misconceptions are overcome through enhanced brain development techniques and teaching kids the proper way to make connections between what they learn and how to utilize the information they are taught when they read. Students that experience reading challenges can quickly fall behind their more skilled classmates, widening the academic gap in later years if they don’t receive the assistance they need.

With the right help, your child can be taught to establish greater awareness of sounds, syllables, recognize the format of written text, vocabulary, and comprehension. For this very reason, Integrated Learning Strategies builds the brain activity of each student through our preparatory programs before mentoring the student in reading. By the time they are ready for our reading program, our students are adequately prepared to recognize the key components of reading.

Reading & Spelling Challenges

Children who face reading challenges may experience the following:

  • Difficulty remembering words they have already seen.
  • Guesses at words when looking at the first letter.
  • Difficulty in associating letters with sounds.
  • Trouble decoding words.
  • Confuses similarly shaped letters such as b, d, p, and q.
  • Makes up words they think might go next in the sentence.
  • Feels reading is slow and laborious.
  • Reading too fast and doesn’t pay attention to punctuation.
  • Frequently loses place while reading.
  • Skips over words or skips lines while reading.

Reading & Spelling Solutions

At Integrated Learning Strategies, our instructional reading and spelling approach supports several researched practices that teach decoding, word recognition, comprehension, vision tracking, and phonemic awareness. In addition, our programs also strengthen our students’ visual memory for sight words and spelling because not all words can be sounded out in the English language. This provides our students with opportunities to make reading fun, spelling more accurate, and homework easier.

Students in our reading and spelling programs show improved academic growth in the following areas:

  • Become Fluent and Confident Readers
  • Build In-depth Vocabulary Knowledge
  • Read faster and more accurately
  • Improve Eye Tracking
  • Increase Auditory and Visual Memory
  • Become Motivated and Engaged Readers
  • Improve Comprehension

Dyslexia

While there are those students who are misdiagnosed with Dyslexia because they display dyslexic symptoms, there are others that have legitimate neurological damage, physical disorders, or inner-ear problems that can cause the reading disorder. The most frequently recognized characteristics of dyslexia are separate from reading difficulties that result in severe reading, spelling and writing delays, disorientation, deficiency with vision or hearing, and reversals of symbols and letters. Dyslexic kids that experience disorientation explains why the brain is not receiving what the eyes see or what the ears hear. Although many educators see the disability as a hindrance to a child’s future, with the correct guidance and training, dyslexic children can succeed in reading and spelling as normal children do. Many times students with dyslexia must read a sentence over several times to glean some meaning from it; however, their auditory comprehension is above average when compared to their counterparts. Most dyslexic children need better instruction to make adequate gains in reading.

In most cases, Dyslexia should be described not as a learning disability, but a teaching disability that is improved with the proper training and techniques. Integrated Learning Strategies programs enhance orientation and symbol mastery for dyslexic children by enabling the child to accurately perceive language and communication.

Our Services

Reading and Spelling

Reading is the foundational element that shapes a child’s future. It impacts their level of education, societal placement, associations with others, financial stability, and ultimately their career growth and development. The future success of all students hinges on their ability to become proficient readers. Surprisingly enough, scientists believe 95% of all children can learn to read, yet about 20% of elementary students nationwide have trouble reading.

The progress of reading development has also changed within the last 20 years. When kids began Kindergarten 20 years ago, educators focused more on creativity and sensory integration as essential building blocks for reading. However, in today’s society, parents and educators now feel the pressures to have children reading before they enter kindergarten.

Some students who experience challenges with reading may be misdiagnosed as “dyslexic” or are perceived as less intelligent. These misconceptions are overcome through enhanced brain development techniques and teaching kids the proper way to make connections between what they learn and how to utilize the information they are taught when they read. Students that experience reading challenges can quickly fall behind their more skilled classmates, widening the academic gap in later years if they don’t receive the assistance they need.

With the right help, your child can be taught to establish greater awareness of sounds, syllables, recognize the format of written text, vocabulary, and comprehension. For this very reason, Integrated Learning Strategies builds the brain activity of each student through our preparatory programs before mentoring the student in reading. By the time they are ready for our reading program, our students are adequately prepared to recognize the key components of reading.

Reading & Spelling Challenges

Children who face reading challenges may experience the following:

  • Difficulty remembering words they have already seen.
  • Guesses at words when looking at the first letter.
  • Difficulty in associating letters with sounds.
  • Trouble decoding words.
  • Confuses similarly shaped letters such as b, d, p, and q.
  • Makes up words they think might go next in the sentence.
  • Feels reading is slow and laborious.
  • Reading too fast and doesn’t pay attention to punctuation.
  • Frequently loses place while reading.
  • Skips over words or skips lines while reading.

Reading & Spelling Solutions

At Integrated Learning Strategies, our instructional reading and spelling approach supports several researched practices that teach decoding, word recognition, comprehension, vision tracking, and phonemic awareness. In addition, our programs also strengthen our students’ visual memory for sight words and spelling because not all words can be sounded out in the English language. This provides our students with opportunities to make reading fun, spelling more accurate, and homework easier.

Students in our reading and spelling programs show improved academic growth in the following areas:

  • Become Fluent and Confident Readers
  • Build In-depth Vocabulary Knowledge
  • Read faster and more accurately
  • Improve Eye Tracking
  • Increase Auditory and Visual Memory
  • Become Motivated and Engaged Readers
  • Improve Comprehension

Dyslexia

While there are those students who are misdiagnosed with Dyslexia because they display dyslexic symptoms, there are others that have legitimate neurological damage, physical disorders, or inner-ear problems that can cause the reading disorder. The most frequently recognized characteristics of dyslexia are separate from reading difficulties that result in severe reading, spelling and writing delays, disorientation, deficiency with vision or hearing, and reversals of symbols and letters. Dyslexic kids that experience disorientation explains why the brain is not receiving what the eyes see or what the ears hear. Although many educators see the disability as a hindrance to a child’s future, with the correct guidance and training, dyslexic children can succeed in reading and spelling as normal children do. Many times students with dyslexia must read a sentence over several times to glean some meaning from it; however, their auditory comprehension is above average when compared to their counterparts. Most dyslexic children need better instruction to make adequate gains in reading.

In most cases, Dyslexia should be described not as a learning disability, but a teaching disability that is improved with the proper training and techniques. Integrated Learning Strategies programs enhance orientation and symbol mastery for dyslexic children by enabling the child to accurately perceive language and communication.

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